Delegate Wendy Gooditis (D-10) is a real estate agent from northern Virginia who campaign on all sorts of popular progressive “hope and change” promises.  So it shouldn’t surprise a soul that Gooditis decided that the most pressing, most urgent issues the General Assembly should face ought to be fighting for a $15 minimum wage repealing Virginia’s right to work laws sticking it to Dominion pushing a series of legislation designed to help her real estate business.

As a member of the now-infamous Freaky 15, not only has she has shown her shameless hypocrisy in the General Assembly by flip-flopping on her campaign issues and voting in favor of people she opposed during her candidacy, but Gooditis is right on track to fool Blue Virginia with her actions that show the deception the Democrats delve into in politics.

In 2015, former 10th District Republican Delegate Randy Minchew filed H.B. 1514 on January 5th, which was proposed to amend the Code of Virginia by adding section 22.1-98.3, relating to the composite index of a locality’s ability to fund K-12 public education. Minchew filed the bill at the request of Clarke County officials and numerous land conservation groups. The highlighted legislation will take use of value real estate in certain localities. The bill reads:

“For the purpose of determining the state and local shares of basic aid funding, the composite index of local ability-to-pay or “local composite index” (LCI) shall utilize the use value of all applicable real estate:

1. Devoted to (i) agricultural use, (ii) horticultural use, (iii) forest use, and (iv) open-space use, as those terms are defined in § 58.1-3230, in each locality that has adopted an ordinance pursuant to § 58.1-3231 by which it assesses the value of such real estate for the purpose of local taxation pursuant to § 58.1-3236 and

2. Used in agricultural and forestral production within (i) an agricultural district, a forestal district, or an agricultural and forestal district established pursuant to Chapter 43 (§ 15.2-4300 et seq.) of Title 15.2 or (ii) an agricultural and forestal district of local significance established pursuant to Chapter 44 (§ 15.2-4400 et seq.) of Title 15.2 in each locality that assesses the value of such real estate for the purpose of local taxation pursuant to § 58.1-3236 regardless of whether it has adopted a local land-use plan or local ordinance pursuant to § 58.1-3231.”

Minchew’s bill failed in the House Education Committee on a close 10-12 vote. At the last minute, officials from Fairfax and Arlington were up in arms over the money they would lose.

Rural areas in the Shenandoah Valley, which include many conservation counties, were in great favor of the measure, allowing them to better provide for children in public education. However, urban areas in Alexandria, Fairfax, and Loudoun (places without or actively bulldozing trees, farms, and green things) shot down the helpful legislation.

During the 2018 Session, on January 6, Gooditis filed H.B. 423. The bill reads:

“For the purpose of determining the state and local shares of basic aid funding, the composite index of local ability-to-pay shall utilize the use value of all applicable real estate:

1. Devoted to agricultural use, horticultural use, forest use, and open-space use, as those terms are defined in § 58.1-3230, in each locality that has adopted an ordinance pursuant to § 58.1-3231 by which it assesses the value of such real estate for the purpose of local taxation pursuant to § 58.1-3236; and

2. Used in agricultural and forestal production within (i) an agricultural district, a forestal district, or an agricultural and forestal district established pursuant to Chapter 43 (§ 15.2-4300 et seq.) of Title 15.2 or (ii) an agricultural and forestal district of local significance established pursuant to Chapter 44 (§ 15.2-4400 et seq.) of Title 15.2 in each locality that assesses the value of such real estate for the purpose of local taxation pursuant to § 58.1-3236, regardless of whether it has adopted a local land-use plan or local ordinance pursuant to § 58.1-3231.”

For those who will not take the time to read both bills, Gooditis included, the bills are not only functionally identical, not only categorically identical, they are EXACTLY identical — word for word.

Now, why would a liberal Democrat file the same bill, word for word, that a Republican filed just three years ago?

3…2…1…HYPOCRISY!

During her 2017 campaign, Gooditis sent out a mailer entitled, “Vote NO on Randy Michew on November 7.” In referencing his 2015 legislation, it states:

Gooditis

“Delegate Randy Minchew voted to save his land-use developer clients millions of dollars in taxes.”

“And pass those unpaid tax dollars to YOU to pay.”

“The legislation would also require local governments to use lower property tax evaluations on community property, costing our schools needed and vital improvements.”

Not only did Gooditis attack Minchew on the basis of blantant dishonesty, she had the audacity to file the exact same bill.

Again… HYPOCRISY!

Now perhaps Gooditis had a momentary lapse in judgment, which means that not only did she not read her own campaign literature (“Paid for and Authorized By…”) but that she may very well have not have read what her bill actually does.

Of course, why would she?

On her website it says, “Wendy was raised to work hard and serve others.” Assuredly, she has worked hard to please the same people she opposed during her election. There is a trend here.

Or perhaps it is just Democrats hoodwinking their voters to grab power.  Wait, actually that has been occurring for over a half-century…

To recap — slander Michnew for legislation you claim to oppose, win in a freak election that no one predicted (even yourself), then turn around and propose the very same legislation you said deserved defeat for your opponent only to file the exact same legislation three years later?

Such is the shamelessness that passes for leadership among Virginia Democrats these days.